Shooting on BLM/Public Land?

Discussion in 'Target Shooting' started by fewenuff, Jan 25, 2009.

  1. fewenuff

    fewenuff New Member

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    Want to go shooting outside with a minimum of hassle. I'm trying to fill in my sketchy memory on locations that are legal. No worries any sites I choose will be checked for range safety and such prior to any shooting going on. I sort of live in the boonies but ALWAYS better to be safe than sorry.

    I know that LA County is out of the question (Kalifornia). But Kern county is just a few miles away with a whole lot of empty desert and BLM lands. Memory serves that if local laws allow, it is not posted, and one complies with distance from others BLM land is wide open for use.

    Any ideas? I want to stay away from private sources as the one's I know I 'd rather not, it's complicated... :wink: Ranges are okay but I'd again rather not frequent the local establishments.

    Thx!
     
  2. fewenuff

    fewenuff New Member

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    Sort of answered my own question here is a partial answer to the BLM/public land but NOT the state land part of the question.

    Yes! Reference below will pop up in a new window.

    <a href="http://www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/prog/recreation/hunting.html" target="_blank">Hunting/Shooting on BLM Land</a>

    Still working on the locals laws. Will keep you posted (haha).

    few
     

  3. fewenuff

    fewenuff New Member

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    :shock: Minimum responses but plenty-o-views.

    I found some more information. Specifically, IF you can get to the BLM/Public land without crossing private property (permission to cross counts as okay), and the location meets all open range/shooting safety and legal requirements you are good to go.

    I recommend contacting local LEO. Luckily the Kern County (Kalifornia) Sheriff is weapons friendly, in all meanings of the phrase, and after a brief e-mail exchange I have a safe and legal place to go plinking about 30 minutes from my house...

    :idea: With the price of land out here going down faster than a...smile...I might just "invest" (haha I made another joke) in a few acres of sand for a private shooting range and bolt-hole. There is a whole lot of empty desert in my neck of the woods.

    Take Care,
     
  4. kitsap

    kitsap New Member

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    I'm not in California (anymore), but while shooting on public lands (blm or national forest) is legal here in western Washington, we are also very much aware that there are plenty of people who also use the same lands who don't target shoot or hunt and some of them would just love to make it more difficult for us.......

    Mabey not the same situation as in Kern county where you've got much longer line-of-site than we do (forest versus desert). On the other hand, our rifle and pistol club just this past year convinced the county to sell our club 65 acres to be used perpetually as a shooting range; i.e. after operating on leased State land since 1926, Kitsap Rifle and Revolver club now owns its own land - with the full support of the county no less. Our primary argument that convinced them to sell us the land (at a very reasonable price) was to point out that it was legal to shoot on Public Lands - but not as safe as compared to having a local range to encourage people to go to..... something to think about since so many people are buying guns nowadays.
     
  5. TMats

    TMats New Member

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    Every time I say something like this, like when I do hunter patrol during the many months of big-game hunting on national forest, I always get the standard, "oh, we always clean up, and pick up other peoples trash along with our own." Still, be sure to pick up after yourself when you leave--that should include brass as well.
     
  6. kitsap

    kitsap New Member

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    I'll second that about picking up the brass..... aside from the public relations angle, it can be a fire hazard in some areas. Also that shredded target...... on the other hand, a well managed range (I should emphasize "well managed") has some real advantages when you consider the possible things that can go wrong..... formal ranges can be a bit of an annoyance what with range safety officers and all and I know that it's always "the other guy" who really needs RSO's but safety is a good investment - especially when its done by fellow Second Ammendment supporters, also a well managed range provides you with some strong arguments for when the environmentalists start targeting you (I know that our range has a certified lead abatement program).
     

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